Welcome To KunLong

Mon-Sat

07:00AM-19:00PM

Call Us

 +86-769-27235720
You are here: Home » News » About Us » The Origin of The Chinese New Year

The Origin of The Chinese New Year

Views:0     Author:Site Editor     Publish Time: 2017-02-17      Origin:Site

The origin of the Chinese New Year is itself centuries old - in fact, too old to actually be traced. It is popularly recognized as the Spring Festival and celebrations last 15 days. 

Preparations tend to begin a month from the date of the Chinese New Year 

(similar to a Western Christmas), when people start buying presents, 

decoration materials, food and clothing. 

A huge clean-up gets underway days before the New Year, when Chinese 

houses are cleaned from top to bottom, to sweep away any traces of bad luck, 

and doors and windowpanes are given a new coat of paint, usually red. The 

doors and windows are then decorated with paper cuts and couplets with 

themes such as happiness, wealth and longevity printed on them. 

The eve of the New Year is perhaps the most exciting part of the event, as 

anticipation creeps in. Here, traditions and rituals are very carefully observed 

in everything from food to clothing. 

Dinner is usually a feast of seafood and dumplings, signifying different good 

wishes. Delicacies include prawns, for liveliness and happiness, dried oysters 

(or ho xi), for all things good, raw fish salad or yu sheng to bring good luck and 

prosperity, Fai-hai (Angel Hair), an edible hair-like seaweed to bring prosperity, 

and dumplings boiled in water (Jiaozi) signifying a long-lost good wish for a 

family. 

It's usual to wear something red as this color is meant to ward off evil spirits - 

but black and white are out, as these are associated with mourning. After 

dinner, the family sit up for the night playing cards, board games or watching 

TV programmers dedicated to the occasion. At midnight, the sky is lit up by 

fireworks. 

On the day itself, an ancient custom called Hong Bao, meaning Red Packet, 

takes place. This involves married couples giving children and unmarried 

adults money in red envelopes. Then the family begins to say greetings from 

door to door, first to their relatives and then their neighbors. Like the Western 

saying "let bygones be bygones," at Chinese New Year, grudges are very easily 

cast aside.

 

The end of the New Year is marked by the Festival of Lanterns, which is a 

celebration with singing, dancing and lantern shows. 

Although celebrations of the Chinese New Year vary, the underlying message 

is one of peace and happiness for family members and friends. 


shangkun.jpg


Address :  No.39, Shichang Road, Zhuanyao Industrial Area, Dongcheng District, Dongguan City, Guangdong Province, China. 

Quick Links

Contact  Us
Contact Person :   Mandy Chen
Tel :  +86-769-27235720
Fax :  +86-769-22687694
Skype :  Latch.Hinge
Phone : +86 139 2920 1144
E-Mail :  Mandy@Kunlong.Net

Send To Us